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November 23, 2017

Library by Roman Emperor Hadrian

Hadrian’s Library was created by Roman Emperor Hadrian in AD 132 on the north side of the Acropolis of Athens.

The building followed a typical Roman Forum architectural style, having only one entrance with a propylon of Corinthian order, a high surrounding wall with protruding niches (oikoi, exedrae) at its long sides, an inner courtyard surrounded by columns and a decorative oblong pool in the middle. The library was on the eastern side where rolls of papyrus “books” were kept. Adjoining halls were used as reading rooms, and the corners served as lecture halls.

The library was seriously damaged by the Herulian invasion of 267 and repaired by the prefect Herculius in AD 407-412. During Byzantine times, three churches were built at the site, the remains of which are preserved:

a tetraconch (5th century AD)
a three-aisled basilica (7th century), and
a simple cathedral (12th century), which was the first cathedral of the city, known as Megali Panagia.
Around the same period as the cathedral another church, Agios Asomatos sta Skalia, was built against the north facade, but it is not preserved.
Photo by: +Vasilios Gavrilis 

Academy of Athens

The Academy of Athens' Building constitutes one of three parts in an "architectural trilogy" consisting of the National Library - the University - and the Academy. The latter was designed in 1859, by the Danish architect Theophil Hansen (1813-1891), the younger brother of the University's architect, Christian Hansen. It is considered the most important work of Hansen, and is regarded by some experts as the most beautiful neoclassic building worldwide. The architect's source of inspiration was the classical architecture of fifth century B.C. Athens, as portrayed in the monuments of the Acropolis. In particular Hansen emulated the aspects of the Ionian rhythm that dominate the Building of the Academy, from the Erechtheion monument. The epitome of all ancient Greek tradition can be found in the Building's sculptural and pictorial decoration; simultaneously the character of that era's Hellenism and its visions for the future are also expressed.
Photo by: +Vasilios Gavrilis 

Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens

The Metropolitan Cathedral of the Annunciation popularly known as the “Mētrópolis”, is the cathedral church of the Archbishopric of Athens and all Greece. Construction of the Cathedral began on Christmas Day, 1842 with the laying of the cornerstone by King Otto and Queen Amalia.
Photo by: +Vasilios Gavrilis 

October 11, 2017

Hadrian’s Library

Hadrian’s Library was created by Roman Emperor Hadrian in AD 132 on the north side of the Acropolis of Athens. The building followed a typical Roman Forum architectural style, having only one entrance with a propylon of Corinthian order, a high surrounding wall with protruding niches at its long sides, an inner courtyard surrounded by columns and a decorative oblong pool in the middle.
Photo by +Vasilios Gavrilis 

Άγιος Νικόλαος Αναβύσσου Αττικής.

Photo by +Nikolaos Pantazis 

Chania Venetian Harbour View

One rarely finds a place so full of historical memories, which unfold before our eyes with exquisite skill through the architecture of the buildings looking onto the Venetian harbour, bearing scents from past times, drawing the visitor into a nostalgic game of the senses, a mixture of East and West. The modern restaurants, cafés and bars add to the charm of the harbour, providing the necessary notes of life and familiar comfort throughout the year.
Photo By +Vasilios Gavrilis